Archive for the ‘Event Descriptions’ Category

Dora Lam-Himlin – “Tumors, Neoplasia, and Cancer: Observations through a Microscope”

Thursday, October 18th, 2012

Speaker: Dora Lam-Himlin, MD. is a practicing pathologist at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona where she specializes in gastrointestinal and liver pathology. She completed her medical school training at Drexel University School of Medicine followed by an anatomic and clinical pathology residency at the University of Maryland Medical center. Following a fellowship at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, she joined the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona in 2010 as a senior associate consultant and assistant professor. Research interests include inflammatory and neoplastic disorders of the luminal gastrointestinal tract, pancreatic cancer, and liver biology.

Location: Biodesign Auditorium

Web Cast: View Live Web Cast

Date & Time: April 4th, 2013 12:00 p.m.

Title: Tumors, Neoplasia, and Cancer: Observations through a Microscope

Abstract: Pathologists observe the biology of cancer on a daily basis, diagnosing new cancers and staging known cancers simply by looking into a simple tool invented nearly 500 years ago. The low tech microscope yields nothing more than a magnified picture, but careful observation will allow specific patterns to emerge. These patterns are the foundation for our understanding of tumors, neoplasia, and cancer. Tumor (“swelling”), neoplasia (“new growth”), and cancer (“crab”) are words often used synonymously among physicians and patients, but they have specific meanings in the world of pathology and oncology. This lecture will focus on some of the basic concepts of neoplasia, discuss patterns of injury and cell growth, and summarize some observations from this biology watcher and pathologist.

Thank you and if you have questions please contact Amanda Wilber! And don’t forget, coffee will be served!

Amanda Wilber, Center for the Convergence of Physical Science and Cancer Biology

Arizona State University | P.O. Box 871504 | Tempe, AZ 85287

480.965.3860 | Fax: 480.965.6362
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Peter Kuhn – “The Fluid Phase of Solid Tumors: How does cancer spread?”

Friday, September 28th, 2012

Speaker: Peter Kuhn, PhD. founded the Scripps Physics Oncology Center with its core research program at the Kuhn Lab. He is a scientist and entrepreneur with a career long commitment in personalized healthcare and individualized cancer patient care. Dr. Kuhn is a physicist who trained at the Julius Maximilians Universität Würzburg, Germany, before receiving his Masters in Physics at the University of Albany, Albany, NY in 1993 and his Ph.D. in 1995. He then moved to Stanford University where he later joined the faculties of Medicine and Accelerator Physics. Since 2002 his primary faculty appointment is with Scripps Research in La Jolla, CA. Dr. Kuhn has co-authored of over 150 peer reviewed scientific publications and patents. Dr. Kuhn is a Director of the Scripps Physics Oncology Center where he is developing the concepts for lifelong diagnostic companions for cancer patients. Leveraging the fluid phase of solid tumors the Scripps Physics Oncology Center is advancing daily the forefront of both improving healthcare effectiveness by providing drug guidance and increasing our understanding of cancer as a disease in each individual patient.

Location: Biodesign Auditorium

Web Cast: View Web Cast Video

Date & Time: November 1st, 2012 12:00 p.m.

Title: The Fluid Phase of Solid Tumors: How does cancer spread?

Abstract: The fluid phase of solid tumors is a clinical tool in personalized cancer care and an emerging research tool in basic science cancer discoveries. The Scripps Physics Oncology Center developed a set of tools for probing the fluid phase. The leading tool is the HD-CTC assay with which we are undertaking a series of clinical studies investigating the metastatic pathways in cancer patients. We are now coupling the experimental data with a theoretical framework for a more complete description of the disease progression.
The fluid phase of solid tumors is a critical third microenvironment in the development and progression of carcinomas. Cells originating from primary or secondary sites travel through the blood circulatory system to either get cleared out or initiate new tumor growth. Translational research efforts are attempting to identify the various subtypes of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), their origins, their destinations and their impact on the disease. Understanding and characterizing CTCs is a first step towards utilizing them as both biopsy material and directly as a biomarker. It requires approaches of subtyping CTCs at the single cell level using molecular and cellular approaches.
Results will be presented that describe technical developments and validation, clinical validation and clinical utility of the HD-CTC Technology.

Thank you and if you have questions please contact Amanda Wilber! And don’t forget, coffee will be served!

Amanda Wilber, Center for the Convergence of Physical Science and Cancer Biology

Arizona State University | P.O. Box 871504 | Tempe, AZ 85287

480.965.3860 | Fax: 480.965.6362
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Landon Inge – “LKB1 and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Can understanding the functions of the LKB1 tumor suppressor lead us to new treatments?”

Friday, September 28th, 2012

Speaker: Landon J. Inge, PhD. holds a B.S. in Cellular and Molecular Biology from the University of Arizona and a Ph.D. in Cellular Molecular Pathology from the University of California, Los Angeles. He is member of the Center for Thoracic Disease and Transplantation at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, where he focused upon identifying new avenues for treating Non-small cell lung cancer and esophageal adenocarcinoma. He has a specific interest in characterizing how loss of the LKB1 tumor suppressor alters the cellular functions within lung cancer cells and utilizing this information to develop therapeutic treatments.

Location: Biodesign Auditorium

Web Cast: View Web Cast

Date & Time: November 15th, 2012 12:00 p.m.

Title: LKB1 and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Can understanding the functions of the LKB1 tumor suppressor lead us to new treatments?

Abstract: Lung cancer, and more specifically non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), is the primary contributor to cancer related mortalities within the United States and accounts for the majority (~80%) of lung cancers compared to the other subtypes. Due to limited choices in treatment (surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiation), significant work has identified unique genetic alterations within NSCLC tumors in hopes of utilizing this information to develop improved treatment modalities. Genetic inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene, LKB1/STK11, is frequent in NSCLC and contributes to NSCLC disease progression. The unique regulatory functions of LKB1, combined with the increased frequency of inactivation in NSCLC, have resulted in considerable interest in developing therapies targeted towards LKB1 null NSCLC. In this talk, I will discuss the current understanding of LKB1’s regulatory functions and contribution of LKB1 loss to NSCLC progression, as well as our and others attempts to tailor treatments towards LKB1 null NSCLC.

Thank you and if you have questions please contact Amanda Wilber! And don’t forget, coffee will be served!

Amanda Wilber, Center for the Convergence of Physical Science and Cancer Biology

Arizona State University | P.O. Box 871504 | Tempe, AZ 85287

480.965.3860 | Fax: 480.965.6362
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Hans-Joachim Ziock – “A New Definition of Information: its Origins and Implications for Cancer”

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

***NEW LOCATION COMPUTING COMMONS 120

Speaker: Hans-Joachim Ziock, PhD. Reflecting his diverse interests, Dr. Ziock’s career covers a wide range of topics. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Virginia. His Ph.D. thesis was in the field of intermediate-energy physics. After joining Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in the intermediate-energy physics group, Dr. Ziock began working in the field of elementary particle physics and became the lead LANL scientist investigating radiation tolerant solid state detectors for collider applications during which he discovered the ability of low temperatures to significantly increase the radiation tolerance and lifetime of these detectors. He was the chief LANL scientist for the high-energy physics Solenoid Detector Collaboration for the Superconducting Super Collider project and then the Large Hadron Collider project. This effort involved working closely with a mechanical engineering group and covered a diverse range of specialties including ultra-stable carbon composite structures, a heat pipe/evaporative cooling system development, and real-time television-based holography. Thereafter, he led the development of an extremely high speed imaging detector system (5 million frames per second) for a proton based radiography program. During this period, Dr. Ziock also became interested in the global issue of carbon management. Dr. Ziock organized and led the Cradle to Grave Carbon Management R&D and Zero Emission Coal programs at LANL. He is a co-inventor of the LANL Zero Emission Coal Technology. He has been the principal investigator at LANL for the CO 2 Mineral Sequestration effort, which involves the permanent disposal of CO 2 in solid mineral form and more recently helped develop the concept of directly extracting CO 2 from the atmosphere. He has most recently been one of the lead scientists on the Protocell Assembly project whose goal has been to produce an artificial self-replicating nanoscale system, where he has been examining the broader issues of self-regulation, information, and artificial intelligence. He continues to pursue efforts in carbon management, energy systems, origins of life, and artificial intelligence.

Location: Computing Commons 120

Web Cast: View Web Cast Video

Date & Time: October 4th, 2012 12:00 p.m.

Title: A New Definition of Information: its Origins and Implications for Cancer

Abstract: Definitions of information are often circular in nature. I present a new definition, rooted in the second law of thermodynamics, based on the requirements of replication and selection. The definition is remarkably simple, yet general enough to apply to both living and non-living systems. Crucially, it provides a scenario for the origin of information while predicting an increase of information with time. The underlying requirements for the continued existence and inevitable growth of information also imply that cancer is an inherent outcome of information’s existence. Much of this work was carried out in collaboration with Stirling Colgate.

Thank you and if you have questions please contact Amanda Wilber! And don’t forget, coffee will be served!

Amanda Wilber, Center for the Convergence of Physical Science and Cancer Biology

Arizona State University | P.O. Box 871504 | Tempe, AZ 85287

480.965.3860 | Fax: 480.965.6362
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Stuart Lindsay – “Epigenetics – Physics or Magic?”

Tuesday, September 4th, 2012

Speaker: Stuart Lindsay, PhD, specializes in biophysics at the molecular level and scanning probe microscopy. Much of his work is aimed at speedier diagnosis and an understanding of the molecular basis of disease. He holds 29 US patents and is a technology advisor for the Atomic Force Microscope Division of Agilent Technologies. Agilent has acquired Molecular Imaging Corporation, which he co-founded in 1993.

Location: Biodesign Auditorium

Web Cast: View Web Cast Video

Date & Time: September 20th, 2012 12:00 p.m.

Title: Epigenetics – Physics or Magic?

Abstract: To a physicist, epigenetics – the passing of heritable traits to daughter cells without alteration of the genome – seems like magic. Yet it surely lies at the heart of cancer, as cancerous phenotypes can be switched on and off without alteration of the genome. Together with the Henikoff lab at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, we have been looking for physical manifestations of epigenetic coding. We started by looking at modifications and variants of histones, but these seem to be unlikely candidates for heritable markers. Instead, it appears that transcription factors (which are passed on at cell division) are the controlling factor. We have also studied methylation of DNA, a modification that imparts permanent silencing. Nucleosomes reconstituted on methylated DNA are intrinsically harder to open, implying a mechanical change in the DNA on methylation. Light scattering studies(by Sara Vaiana and Stephanie Cope) shows that methylation makes no difference in bulk solution. In contrast, AFM studies show that DNA shortens and stiffens with methylation at a solid-liquid interface. We therefore conclude that the hydrophobic interaction plays a role in keeping methylated DNA in place on nucleosomes.

Thank you and if you have questions please contact Amanda Wilber! And don’t forget, coffee will be served!

Amanda Wilber, Center for the Convergence of Physical Science and Cancer Biology

Arizona State University | P.O. Box 871504 | Tempe, AZ 85287

480.965.3860 | Fax: 480.965.6362
email hidden; JavaScript is required

Rod McEver – “Force-regulated adhesion of leukocytes to vascular surfaces”

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Speaker: Rod McEver, MD, holds a B.A. from Yale University and earned his medical degree at the University of Chicago. He joined OMRF’s scientific staff in 1987 and currently holds the Eli Lilly Chair in Biomedical Research. Previously, McEver was a George Lynn Cross Research Professor at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, where he remains an adjunct professor of biochemistry and molecular biology.
In 2004, McEver secured more than $4 million in National Institutes of Health grants, making him one of the most highly funded researchers in Oklahoma. “Rod McEver is a tremendous scientist, and I have no doubt he will provide both a steady hand and tremendous vision as he guides our researchers into a new period of growth and discovery,” said OMRF President J. Donald Capra, M.D.

Location: Biodesign Auditorium

Web Cast: View Live Web Cast

Date & Time: November 29th, 2012 12:00 p.m.

Title: Force-regulated adhesion of leukocytes to vascular surfaces

Abstract: During inflammation, flowing leukocytes tether to and roll on activated endothelial cells, then decelerate and arrest before they emigrate into the underlying tissues. Interactions of selectins with glycosylated ligands mediate leukocyte rolling, a prerequisite for integrin-mediated deceleration and arrest. Counterintuitively, rolling requires a minimal flow rate, or shear threshold. As flow drops below this threshold, rolling becomes more rapid and irregular until the cells detach. Shear stress applies force to bonds between selectins and their ligands, which affects their lifetimes. As flow increases from suboptimal levels, force first prolongs bond lifetimes (catch bonds) until they reach a maximal level. Further increases in force shorten bond lifetimes (slip bonds). Catch bonds between selectins and ligands enable flow-enhanced adhesion of leukocytes to vascular surfaces and may prevent inappropriate agglutination of circulating cells. Recent data indicate that the mechanical environment of blood flow influences the functions of other adhesion receptors on leukocytes and platelets during infection or tissue injury. Mechanical forces might also regulate migration of tumor cells in extravascular tissues and metastasis of tumor cells through the blood stream.

Thank you and if you have questions please contact Amanda Wilber! And don’t forget, coffee will be served!

Amanda Wilber, Center for the Convergence of Physical Science and Cancer Biology

Arizona State University | P.O. Box 871504 | Tempe, AZ 85287

480.965.3860 | Fax: 480.965.6362
email hidden; JavaScript is required

Steve Henikoff – “Histone variants, nucleosome dynamics and epigenetics”

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

Speaker: Steve Henikoff, PhD, received a BS degree in Chemistry from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Harvard University, and carried out postdoctoral research at the University of Washington. He joined the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle in 1981, where he is a Member of the Basic Sciences Division and an Affiliate Professor of Genome Science at the University of Washington. He has been an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute since 1990 and a Member of the US National Academy of Sciences since 2005. He is co-Editor-in-Chief of Epigenetics & Chromatin, a member of the Editorial Boards of Trends in Genetics, Current Opinion in Genetics and Development and Genome Biology, and a member of the Scientific Adisory Boards of Epizyme, Inc. and the Chicago Biomedical Consortium. His laboratory studies chromatin processes, epigenetic inheritance, centromere structure, function and evolution, and develops tools for epigenomics.

Location: Biodesign Auditorium

Web Cast: View Web Cast Video

Date & Time: September 6th, 2012 12:00 p.m.

Title: Histone variants, nucleosome dynamics and epigenetics

Abstract: Dr. Henikoff will talk about histone variants, nucleosome dynamics and epigenetics.

Thank you and if you have questions please contact Amanda Wilber! And don’t forget, coffee will be served!

Amanda Wilber, Center for the Convergence of Physical Science and Cancer Biology

Arizona State University | P.O. Box 871504 | Tempe, AZ 85287

480.965.3860 | Fax: 480.965.6362
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Karen Anderson – “Designing Cancer Vaccines: From Antigen Identification to Targeting Tumor Dormancy”

Friday, April 6th, 2012

Speaker: Karen Anderson, MD, PhD, Dr. Anderson graduated from the University of Virginia with a BA in Chemistry. She then completed a combined MD and PhD program at Duke University, where she studied immunology under Dr. Peter Cresswell, a National Academy member and HHMI investigator now at Yale University. She completed internal medicine residency at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and hematology/oncology fellowship training at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, where she remained for 11 years as faculty, until she came here to ASU in late 2011. Her laboratory focuses on understanding how the immune response can be harnessed to detect and alter cancer development.

Location: Biodesign Auditorium

Web Cast: View Web Cast

Date & Time: April 19th, 2012 12:00 p.m.

Title: Designing Cancer Vaccines: From Antigen Identification to Targeting Tumor Dormancy

Abstract: Cancer does not exist in a vacuum: the host immune system continuously monitors cells for alterations in protein content and structure. Several key questions in cancer immunology are the identification of antigens associated with tumor destruction, optimal timing and method of antigen delivery, and the identification of the regulatory pathways and tumor heterogeneity that limit effective immunity. The design of future vaccines requires understanding both the targets and the biology of effective anti-tumor immune responses. To determine if tumor cells can induce effective immune responses, we conducted first-in-human clinical trials of autologous breast cancer vaccination with tumor cells engineered to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a potent cytokine that stimulates immune activation. These studies demonstrated that autologous vaccination induces both antibody and T-cell immunity to tumor-derived proteins with minimal toxicity. Using proteomic monitoring of immune responses, the breadth and specificity of the immune response was determined. However, the timing of immune activation is critical; immunotherapy is likely to be most effective at eradicating minimal residual disease before the immune system is too impaired from the burden of disease. For breast and prostate cancers, tumor cells may disseminate early, and are frequently found dormant for years in the bone marrow prior to reactivation. The design of future immunotherapies that target both primary and disseminated tumor cells in the bone marrow will be discussed.

Thank you and if you have questions please contact Amanda Wilber! And don’t forget, coffee will be served!

Amanda Wilber, Center for the Convergence of Physical Science and Cancer Biology

Arizona State University | P.O. Box 871504 | Tempe, AZ 85287

480.965.3860 | Fax: 480.965.6362
email hidden; JavaScript is required

Barbara Hempstead, MD, PhD, Weill Cornell Medical College – “The Impact of Genomic Evolution on Clinical Challenges”

Monday, March 26th, 2012

Speaker: Barbara Hempstead, MD, PhD, is the Senior Co-investigator and Center Co-Director, the O. Wayne Isom Professor of Medicine, and Co-Chief of the Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology at Weill Cornell Medical College, New York. Dr. Hempstead is a practicing board-certified medical oncologist and hematologist and the principal investigator for numerous NIH research grants. Her research effort focuses on the study of growth factors, neurotrophins. She is evaluating the role of neurotrophins in regulating vessel growth, stabilization and regression, in models of vascular development and in tumors. Dr. Hempstead administratively oversees with Co-Division Chief, Dr. David Nanus, a faculty of 43 academic clinical researchers, translational scientists and basic scientists focused on cancer. These include clinical investigators with more than 100 ongoing clinical trials, most with translational components. She is a member of the Internal Advisory Board for the New York-Presbyterian-Weill Cornell Cancer Center, and has chaired international meetings in her area of research interest.

Location: Biodesign Auditorium

Web Cast: View Web Cast

Date & Time: April 5th, 2012 12:00 p.m.

Title: The Impact of Genomic Evolution on Clinical Challenges

Abstract: The major recent advances in genomic sequencing provide unparalleled opportunities to identify novel mechanisms that regulate susceptibility to human diseases, as well as disease pathogenesis and progression. However, the heterogeneity of human populations leads to complexity that complicates these analyses. Here, we will discuss clinical conundrums of human adaptation to extreme environments, and the impact of tumor heterogeneity on clinical prognoses, for which genetic profiling has uncovered unique and targetable pathways to improve patient outcomes.

Thank you and if you have questions please contact Amanda Wilber! And don’t forget, coffee will be served!

Amanda Wilber, Center for the Convergence of Physical Science and Cancer Biology

Arizona State University | P.O. Box 871504 | Tempe, AZ 85287

480.965.3860 | Fax: 480.965.6362
email hidden; JavaScript is required

“The End of Illness” – David Agus, watch the public lecture here

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Speaker: Davis Agus, M.D, is an internationally renowned oncologist who holds the position of Professor of Medicine at the University of Southern California. A true visionary, he has become known as an incisive commentator on cancer research and clinical practice.

Location: NEEB Hall

Date & Time: February 29th, 2012 7:00 pm

Title: The End of Illness

Abstract: Dr. Agus proposes a new “systemic” model of health that will dramatically change not only how we take care of ourselves, but also how we spur the next generation of treatments and, in some instances, cures. It’s like that old saying of having to go to war in order to understand peace. His war on cancer in particular has given him a rare and unique vantage point that he has used to develop this different way of honoring the body’s preferred way of life. His ultimate goal is to teach people how to stave off illness and save their own lives through the tactical strategies of personalized medicine and practical prescriptions that are tailored to their specific needs and bodies.

Beyond Center

Center for the Convergence of Physical Science and Cancer Biology

Arizona State University | P.O. Box 871504 | Tempe, AZ 85287

480.965.3860 | Fax: 480.965.6362

If you have any questions, please contact Amanda Wilber
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